Next Generation Information Experience: Trends und Herausforderungen von morgen

Wie gehen wir als Ersteller, Verwalter und Nutzer zukünftig mit Inhalten, Informationen und Wissen um?

Dieser Artikel ist ursprünglich und im Original erschienen im Tagungsband der Usability Professionals UP14, ergänzend zu meinem Vortrag auf der Konferenz im September 2014.

Abstract

Digitale Informationen und Services müssen zukünftig aus unterschiedlichsten Quellen zum Abruf auf verschiedenen Geräten, in unterschiedlichsten Medien, für mehrere Screens und Ausgabekanäle zur Verfügung stehen. Der Beitrag beschäftigt sich mit zukünftigen „Content-Szenarien“, den potentiellen Anforderungen von Nutzern und den Herausforderungen für Content-Ersteller und -anbieter, Website-Betreiber, Publisher, Journalisten und Medienunternehmen. Hierzu werden Erkenntnisse und ausgewählte Quellen vorgestellt und es wird skizziert, wie der Umgang mit Informationen und Content Management zukünftig aussehen könnte.

1 Einführung

1.1.Status Quo und Motivation

Die Zahl der Menschen, die das Internet auf verschiedenen Geräten nutzen, steigt stetig. Digitale Informationen und Services müssen zum Abruf in unterschiedlichsten Medien, für mehrere Screens und Ausgabekanäle zur Verfügung stehen. Der Anspruch „Create Once, Publish Everywhere“ (COPE) (Jacobson, 2009) – allgemein wie Informationen und Inhalte zukünftig erstellt, verwaltet, verbreitet und konsumiert werden – ist eine der zentralen Herausforderungen in der digitalen Informationsgesellschaft. Die (zukünftigen) Informationsbedürfnisse der Nutzer und die Bedürfnisse der Inhaltsersteller müssen bestmöglich berücksichtigt werden.

 

Multiscreen Experience Design: Smart Content

Abb. 1: Smart Content: Verschiedenste Inhaltstypen müssen sich auf unterschiedlichen Medien publizieren lassen.

Informationen und Inhalte lassen sich als Produkte betrachten (Informationsprodukt). Egal ob Produktdaten, Dateiformate oder Inhalte unterschiedlicher Art – es geht grundsätzlich darum, diese Informationen, die oft in unterschiedlichsten Quellen und Formaten zur Verfügung stehen, zu verwalten, zusammenzuführen und zu

Read more ›

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Veröffentlicht in Content, Multiscreen, NGIX, User Experience

Designing for Multiscreen — Challenges are chances! (6/6)

Here’s the 6th topic you should consider when developing strategies for digital services across multiple screens

Multiscreen - four devices

More and more people are using more and more screens. Users expect to access information on all relevant screens. Thus digital services require a holistic strategy.

Together with Pascal Raabe, from the UI/UX studio ustwo™ I’m going to introduce six practical tips (in an article series) that can help you improve your own digital products and services by employing an effective multiscreen strategy.

Overview

  1. Think multiscreen
  2. Know your screens
  3. Put the user at the centre
  4. Context is King
  5. Multiscreen-ready layout and content!
  6. Challenges are chances

This is the last article of my series.

6) Challenges are chances

Internet, synchronisation, and cloud computing are fundamental pillars of a functioning multiscreen strategy. Think about fallback solutions for poor connection speed, for example in areas with no reception. Watch out for project specific challenges and chances of cross-device and cross-platform concepts in regards to information, interaction, communication and collaboration.

That’s easier said than done. Beside conceptual and strategic challenges you also need to consider the technical requirements. They may change over time.

Desktop, mobile website or app?

There’s always the question whether a pure desktop offering is sufficient (a clear “No” to that) or whether a mobile optimised version is needed. Whether a native application or a web app is the better solution for mobile devices needs to be decided on a case by case basis. When using web apps it depends on the particular project if responsive webdesign or a separate mobile offering is better suited. We already discussed the responsive design approach. It’s a very complex subject matter. Read more ›

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Veröffentlicht in Multiscreen, Strategie

Designing for Multiscreen — Multiscreen-ready layout and content! (5/6)

The 5th one of 6 things you should consider when developing strategies for digital services across multiple screens

Multiscreen - four devices

More and more people are using more and more screens. Users expect to access information on all relevant screens. Thus digital services require a holistic strategy.

Together with Pascal Raabe, from the UI/UX studio ustwo™ I’m going to introduce six practical tips (in an article series) that can help you improve your own digital products and services by employing an effective multiscreen strategy.

Overview

  1. Think multiscreen
  2. Know your screens
  3. Put the user at the centre
  4. Context is King
  5. Multiscreen-ready layout and content!
  6. Challenges are chances

This is the fifth article. The last one will follow in November.

5) Multiscreen-ready layout and content!

Everything stands and falls with data suitable for multiscreen. Flexible and dynamic layouts and (!) content are paramount. This requires appropriate content management workflows and a suitable content strategy. Of course the content should never be isolated from the potential user and the context of use.

Responsive Webdesign

A modern information offering needs to be accessible on every relevant device. However even within the separate device classes there are enormous differences in terms of the screen size and resolution. Employing flexible, scaleable and adaptive layouts that respond to the device or screen and its properties are a must (see also Marcotte and Tran).

Layout patterns

There are two different approaches: Either the content layout adapts to the changing width when reducing the browser size or you define two or more breakpoints for the output on different devices. Breakpoints are thresholds for which new or different layout templates, rules and definitions apply.

Luke Wrobleski identified five general layout patterns: Mostly Fluid, Column Drop, Layout Shifter, Tiny Tweaks, Off Canvas. These patterns differ in the alignment of the different layout elements depending on the changing screen width. For some only the content area shrinks, others change the alignment of elements at certain breakpoints to be displayed below the main content or somewhere else. Read more ›

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Veröffentlicht in Content, Multiscreen

Designing for Multiscreen — Context is King! (4/6)

The 4th one of 6 things you should consider when developing strategies for digital services across multiple screens

Multiscreen - four devices

More and more people are using more and more screens. Users expect to access information on all relevant screens. Thus digital services require a holistic strategy.

Together with Pascal Raabe, from the UI/UX studio ustwo™ I’m going to introduce six practical tips (in an article series) that can help you improve your own digital products and services by employing an effective multiscreen strategy.

Overview

  1. Think multiscreen
  2. Know your screens
  3. Put the user at the centre
  4. Context is King
  5. Multiscreen-ready layout and content!
  6. Challenges are chances

This is the fourth article. The other articles will follow on a regular basis.

4) Context is King!

You should know, understand and define the relevant contexts of use and the parameters user, device, mode of use, situation, and environment.

The context of use is complex with many facets. It is mainly defined by the user, the devices being used, and the physical and social environment. The boundaries are blurred, so it’s not enough to simply differentiate between a stationary and a mobile situation. Whenever we use a mobile device we’re in a mobile context of use. The mobile context of use is therefore potentially everywhere.

The context of use is influenced by the user, the device and the parameters environment, situation and mode of use.

Environment

In every environment you’re bound by particular circumstances. These circumstances can influence one another. The private environment and generally all private spaces are not accessible to strangers or outsiders. A semi-public space is usually only accessible to a limited group of people, often staying only temporarily. The public space is accessible to everyone. Everybody can participate in the situation. It is not private. When you’re on the move, you’re changing location and are on the way from one place to another. The current place changes continuously until you reach your destination. Read more ›

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Veröffentlicht in Multiscreen

Designing for Multiscreen — Put the user at the centre (3/6)

The 3rd one of 6 things you should consider when developing strategies for digital services across multiple screens

Multiscreen - four devices

More and more people are using more and more screens. Users expect to access information on all relevant screens. Thus digital services require a holistic strategy.

Together with Pascal Raabe, from the UI/UX studio ustwo™ I’m going to introduce six practical tips (in an article series) that can help you improve your own digital products and services by employing an effective multiscreen strategy.

Overview

  1. Think multiscreen
  2. Know your screens
  3. Put the user at the centre
  4. Context is King
  5. Multiscreen-ready layout and content!
  6. Challenges are chances

This is the third article. The other articles will follow on a two-weekly basis.

3) Put The User at the Centre!

Know your target audience. Who are the most important users, what devices do they use and why? What are their goals and needs?

Know your users and their routine.

In order to make digital applications support your users’ daily routine, rather than dominate it, you should consider behavioural patterns early on in the process. Keep in mind that, when you’re creating concepts and interfaces for multiple screens, in actual fact you’re creating a service.

It’s important to know as much about your target audience as you can. It’s very useful to understand your users, their environment and their needs and goals. Who are your most common users and what are the devices they use? What does a day in the life of your typical user look like? What are the relevant touch points, ie. what device are they using when and what for?

In order to make the initial process of defining your target audience easier, it helps to look at user personas based on archetypes. We have developed eight representative archetypal personas of today’s digital society in the western world based on the population in Germany. These archetypes could of course be extended and adapted to other countries and cultures. The digital society comprises of all people, from the completely networked multiscreener to the digital outsider.

The digital society comprises of all people, from the completely networked multiscreener to the digital outsider. The user types are based on a study of »Initiative D21«

Using qualitative research you should identify the relevant users, their goals and particularly their use of media in order to prioritise the devices your service needs to cater for. Having developed personas from this research it also makes it easier to recruit relevant test subjects for user testing further down the line. Read more ›

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Veröffentlicht in Multiscreen, User Experience

Designing for Multiscreen — Know your screens (2/6)

The 2nd one of 6 things you should consider when developing strategies for digital services across multiple screens

Multiscreen - four devices

Introduction

More and more people are using more and more screens. Users expect to access information on all relevant screens. Everything needs to work across devices. Digital services are part of a whole ecosystem. They require a holistic strategy.

Together with Pascal Raabe, from the UI/UX studio ustwo™ I’m going to introduce six practical tips (in an article series) that can help you improve your own digital products and services by employing an effective multiscreen strategy.

Overview

  1. Think multiscreen
  2. Know your screens
  3. Put the user at the centre
  4. Context is King
  5. Multiscreen-ready layout and content!
  6. Challenges are chances

This is the second article. The other articles will follow on a weekly to two-weekly basis.

2) Know your screens

When we’re talking about screens, we’re really talking about devices. The screens we’re typically using on a daily basis can be classified into four device groups: smartphones, tablets, desktop or laptop PCs and smart TVs. It’s important to consider these groups, their properties, how they’re typically used, and how they can be combined.

The four devcie groups with typical screensizes in relation to each other: smartphone, tablet, laptop or desktop PC and internet-ready TVs.

The four device groups can be defined by their context of use, the way one interacts with the device or navigates the content, and by the main input method — for example remote control, gestures, mouse, keyboard, touch, or sensors. Further they can be described by their typical display size and the distance of the user to the screen. Read more ›

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Veröffentlicht in Multiscreen

Designing for Multiscreen — Think Multiscreen (1/6)

6 things you should consider when developing strategies for digital services across multiple screens


Multiscreen - four devices

Introduction

More and more people are using more and more screens — and more often than not they do this simultaneously. We see this in our own lives, whether personally or professionally. Users expect to access information on all relevant screens and across multiple channels. Everything needs to work across devices. Digital services are no longer isolated applications but part of a whole ecosystem. They require a holistic strategy.

As part of our Multiscreen Experience Project, the Designer Valentin Fischer and I gathered and developed — over many years — a number of patterns, methodologies, and insights and compiled them in a book (published by digiparden GmbH) to help and inspire professionals looking to develop this strategy for their own digital products and services.

Update (12/14/2015): The completely revised and updated English book “Multiscreen UX Design” is available since 14th December 2015.

There are three important elements of a useful and user-friendly multiscreen offering: Firstly knowing the devices and their capabilities; secondly understanding the users and their capabilities; and finally considering the context in which users use these devices.

Together with Pascal Raabe, from the UI/UX studio ustwo™, who has helped us during the process of writing the book, I’m going to introduce six practical tips (in an article series) that can help you improve your own digital products and services by employing an effective multiscreen strategy.

Overview

  1. Think multiscreen
  2. Know your screens
  3. Put the user at the centre
  4. Context is King
  5. Multiscreen-ready layout and content!
  6. Challenges are chances

This is my first article on Medium with the first tip. The other articles will follow on a weekly to two-weekly basis.

So let’s get started…

1) Think Multiscreen

Increasing device fragmentation leads to a change in how these devices are being used. This is one of the greatest challenges we’re facing today when developing concepts and strategies for digital services. Multiscreen is not a nice add-on any more, it’s a requirement. In principle every digital offering needs to cater for multiple devices. A holistic approach will help you to offer a considered experience to your users across multiple screens. It will increase your chances to cater for your customers in a way they naturally expect. We discovered and compared a number of typical patterns, strategies and examples that emerged with the multiscreen landscape. It’s important to consider the particular aspects and best practices for each.

There are various models, principles, methods and approaches which you can utilise during the conception of cross-device and cross-platform services.

Some of the following models are based partially on the classification and definition of the precious design studio from Hamburg. We have expanded, aggregated and adapted this model.

Mobile First
It is advisable to concentrate on the most important device first. The smallest screen forces a meaningful structure of information. If one develops initially for small screens, owing to the necessity for size reduction, this will result in a better structuring of the information. Luke Wroblewski wrote a great book about that topic.

Simultaneity
Different devices or information services are used simultaneously. Different pieces of information may complement one another.

Social TV
Spatially-separated viewers can quasi watch TV together or directly participate. Programmes are recommended based upon the user profiles.

Device Shifting
The display of information or content is shifted to a separate device by the user. The display is switched from one screen to the other.

Complementarity
Devices influence, control and complement both each other and the information displayed on the screens.

Synchronisation
Information is always synchronised between devices and thus is kept updated to the same extent on all devices.

Screen Sharing
The display of information or an information source is extended and distributed across multiple screens.

Coherence
Information is displayed in a manner that is device and screen independent, logical, and coherent. Individual features are optimised for device capabilities and form of use.

Fluidity
Informational offerings should function similarly between devices and offer a uniform and fluid user experience.

Smart Content
Content should be as flexible as possible, to be easily used and published across different channels and devices.

Mashability
Platform-independent and flexible information can be combined with interfaces in order to create new added-value services.

Communification
Social networking and creating a community can make an information service more attractive for the users. Users create, share, rate, and comment on content.

Gamification
Game mechanics simulate a competitive environment. A game factor can motivate people if it is challenging and provides relevant goals.

Storyfication
With a story, one can create a cross-device user experience and increase the understanding of the product.

Emotionality
A service is emotionally more attractive, if it is fun and supports a device fragmented daily routine.

Microjoyment
Owing to the increasing density of information, one must maximally optimise the user experience for small, but important sub-tasks.

Hybrid Media
The cross-media combination of analogue and digital media in order to form a cumulative informational offering is the expansion of purely digital approaches.

Technical Challenges
As with all digital projects, one should also be familiar with the technical challenges and take them into consideration.

Legal Issues
There are various valid legal directives which must be responsibly followed.

Most of the briefly described patterns will be explained in the upcoming articles.

So, that’s the introduction for now. Stay tuned for the second article, because it’s important to “Know your screens”. Any questions? Just send me an e-mail.

—–

With the „Multiscreen Experience Design“ project we gathered and developed a number of patterns, methodologies, and insights and compiled them in a book (published 2013 in German by digiparden, an imprint of SETU GmbH). In this article series I introduce(d) some important aspects of a useful and user-friendly multiscreen offering.

Update (12/14/2015): If you’re more interested in the topic. My new English book “Multiscreen UX Design” is available sind 14th December 2015.

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Veröffentlicht in Multiscreen